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Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Guest User - Wednesday, 30 May 2007, 04:48 PM
  I have absolutely no clue and I've been searching all over the internet to find the translations. If anyone could help...that'd be great!!

glikia mou

thespinis mou

Thanks!!
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Andreas Leitgeb - Thursday, 31 May 2007, 06:34 AM
  I'm not greek, either, but perhaps I can still help.

"glikia mou" is properly spelled: "γλυκιά μου"
and means: "my sweet one", probably "my sweetheart"

"thespinis mou" is properly spelled: "Δεσποινίς μου"
and means (literally) "my Miss". ("my girl")
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Guest User - Thursday, 31 May 2007, 10:58 AM
  Correct translations but a note: in general, "despoinis mou" is sort of wquivalent for "my young lady" not "my girl"
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Andreas Leitgeb - Thursday, 31 May 2007, 01:03 PM
  "young lady" ... indeed that's the expression that had escaped me ...
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Guest User - Saturday, 2 June 2007, 11:47 PM
  Thank you sooooo much!
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Guest User - Saturday, 2 June 2007, 12:58 PM
  Can i have a big request for u guys??

What does it mean, exactly MANA MOU...and this sentences:

Pragmatika en pou ta pio wraia pou ethkievasa!
En ginetai!

thank you a lot in anticipation
Robert
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Guest User - Saturday, 2 June 2007, 03:14 PM
  Hi there
MANA MOU literally means "my mom/mother" (the form MANA is a sort of in-between the "formal" MITERA and the form "MAMA"= mom)

As an expletive though it can have many meanings and show admiration, fear etc. It is also used as a term of indearment (my next door neighbour, almost old enough to be my granny, uses it when she talks to me quite often smile )

Now for the sentences. They are both in the Cypriot dialect.

(It is) indeed one from the most beautiful/ nicest (books?) I've read.
It's impossible (verbatim: It's not happening)
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Guest User - Sunday, 3 June 2007, 07:39 AM
  Thank u soooo much Irene smile
euxaristw Irene mou smile
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Andreas Leitgeb - Friday, 6 July 2007, 05:14 PM
  I wonder if this "mana mou" is really addressing the listener.
I mean, I don't think that Italians say "mamma mia" only when
talking to their mums...
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Alan Gagne - Wednesday, 20 June 2007, 04:16 PM
  I'm not Greek but I recognize some of these words.

Pragmatika--Really,

En ginetai --I'm am almost 100% sure it is - Get Well! The Greek is "Na ginetai" it is the Greek word "to cure" but used in the reflexive as you have indicated it means to "get well" as in "Cure yourself" Like in the following sentence

Efkome na genis kala-- "I hope you are curing well" This is how the Greeks say "Hope you're getting better!"

maybe this helps you a little as for the other words, because they are translitterated appear a little strange (This could be Cypriot dialect perhaps)

"en pou" could be "Na pow" "I am going"

alangagne@hotmail.com
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Guest User - Friday, 6 July 2007, 07:18 AM
  my sweet
my miss
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Guest User - Friday, 6 July 2007, 10:15 AM
  paul, my sweet is glyka mou
my miss could be despi mou or despina mou.
Sorry I haven't mastered the Greek keyboard characters yet.
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Guest User - Saturday, 7 July 2007, 01:02 PM
  I think you mean "Despoinis mou" smile

Δεσποινίς μου in Greek characters. If, that is, "miss" has its usual meaning.

I also prefer glykia mou (γλυκιά μου) to glyka mou (γλύκα μου) although that's more a case of personal preference.

As for "mana mou" see my previous post. One of the ways it is used that I'm talking about is to express admiration (sort of like "wow" or indeed "mama mia" smile )
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Re: Can anyone translate these two for me?
by Guest User - Tuesday, 9 October 2007, 09:49 PM
  wish i could answer that.. i am new to this and i dont know how to ask a question or how to post..


DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT ylipse pa arhiphia mou COULD POSSIBLY MEAN?